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Greening China’s Financial System

The event, “Greening China’s Financial System, was co-organised by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), the UNEP-Inquiry, and China Carbon Forum (CCF). The panel discussion involved a range of eminent speakers who provided comprehensive and in-depth discussion of green finance in China, as well as internationally. The panel in particular discussed the outcomes of two streams of work on green finance. The first, with a new report titled Greening China’s Financial System, is a joint project between the Development Research Centre of China’s State Council (DRC) and IISD. The second is from a joint Green Finance Task Force co-convened by the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) and UNEP-Inquiry.

The speakers on the panel discussions presented a good balance of perspectives, approaching the topic from governmental, academic and think-tank viewpoints. This range of views made for a stimulating Q&A session with the audience. For full Executive Summary and Record of Discussion, download PDF: Greening China’s Financial System

Financing the green transition in China: opportunities for local government access to climate finance

“Financing the green transition in China: opportunities for local government access to climate finance”, is part of the China Low Carbon Leadership Network 2012-2014 event series jointly organized by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) and China Carbon Forum.

It saw the launch of an important new report on opportunities for accessing climate finance by Chinese provincial governments, with a focus on Guangdong. The report, a collaborative project between GIZ and The Climate Group, can be downloaded here: Analysis of Climate Finance Policies and Innovative Finance Mechanisms in Guangdong Policy Mapping and Case Studies

Local Climate Governance: a key to realizing national targets?

This event was part of the series held by the Low Carbon Leadership Network, jointly organized by China Carbon Forum and GIZ. The event discussed a wide range of important issues currently facing China in managing climate change. It focused on the role of local governments and identified some key areas where the panelists thought that improvements could be made. Importantly the panel identified further bilateral collaboration as crucial to helping China meet these challenges successfully.

The event builds on a dialogue which was started in December 2013 when a high level delegation of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), led by Deputy Director General Sun Zhen, traveled to North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) for a series of meetings on the topic of Climate Governance and attended the NRW climate congress in Wuppertal. Since then the dialogue on the topic has continued with various stakeholders, including China’s National Center for Climate Strategy and International Cooperation (NCSC) and the Wuppertal Institute. For Record of Discussion and Executive Summary, download PDF: Local Climate Governance

China’s National ETS: The Way Forward

On 20th May 2014, China Carbon Forum together with EuropeAid’s project team for the “Design and Implementation of Emissions Trading Systems in China” (the EU – China ETS Project) held an event to launch the implementation of the project. The event involved a discussion on “China’s National ETS: The Way Forward”, which took a forward look at the development of a national emissions trading scheme in China.

The national ETS could become a key component of China’s bold ambitions to control its growing carbon emissions and is being watched closely by many other countries and regions that are developing and implementing their own emissions trading systems and carbon market mechanisms. For Executive Summary of this event, download PDF: China’s National ETS- The Way Forward

 

How can China and the EU get the most out of Paris 2015?

On 24th April 2014, China Carbon Forum and the Beijing climate community welcomed the EU Climate Commissioner, Ms. Connie Hedegaard, to participate in a discussion on ‘How can China get the most out of Paris 2015?’ along with other distinguished panelists.

The panel discussed the importance of international cooperation leading up to the Paris COP21 in 2015, and emphasized the existing partnership between the EU and China in the areas of energy, urbanization and emissions trading. The panel suggested that this must be allowed to help progress discussions in the UNFCCC. While differentiation of responsibility should be considered a core principle of any deal in Paris, it must nevertheless be equally binding to all parties. The current slow progress, including climate finance assistance from developed countries, must be overcome in order to build confidence amongst parties and lift ambition. It is also important that public support contribute momentum in the lead up to COP21, as it did prior to the Copenhagen conference in 2009. The panel agreed that much has changed since Copenhagen, including increasing evidence of the seriousness of the challenge, awareness amongst leaders in both politics and industry, as well as significant domestic action worldwide. With strong cooperation between now and COP21 between the EU and China, and working to achieve agreements on key issues prior to the meeting, the chances of a successful outcome will be greatly increased.

For the full Executive Summary, please download PDF: How can China and the EU get the most out of Paris 2015

Stabilizing Carbon Markets: Lessons learned and applicability for China’s promising carbon markets

China’s carbon market is developing quickly, and China is on its way to establishing the world’s largest carbon market. For China’s carbon market to be effective, stable carbon prices with a rising forward curve are necessary. An international reserve, which supports a strong and rising carbon price, could be of significant benefit to China, both as a demander of credits in the future, and also as a supplier given the stranded assets currently under the CDM. On March 5th 2014, China Carbon Forum, in cooperation with the Climate Markets & Investment Association, and Association for Sustainable and Responsible Investment in Asia launched the Brookings Institution and Climate Advisers’ innovative Carbon Market Reserves Report in Beijing. The event successfully shared the report’s main messages, lessons learned and heard feedback from China’s climate stakeholders on the future development of domestic and global carbon markets.

For full Executive Summary, please download PDF: Stabilizing Carbon Markets 

Brookings Report: http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2013/12/international-carbon-market-volatility-purvis

Learning from Warsaw COP19: The Path Forward for International Cooperation

The Panel - From Left: Mr. Stian Reklev (Moderator - Thomson Reuters), Mr. Zhang Xiaohua (National Centre for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation), Mr. Jacob Werksman (European Commission), Mr. Deng Liangchun (WWF), Ass. Pr. Craig Hart (Renmin University)

The Panel – From Left: Mr. Stian Reklev (Moderator – Thomson Reuters), Mr. Zhang Xiaohua (National Centre for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation), Mr. Jacob Werksman (European Commission), Mr. Deng Liangchun (WWF), Ass. Pr. Craig Hart (Renmin University)

 

China understands that to win the battle over global climate change it must play a significant role. Developed countries are witnessing China’s national mitigation plan and its constructive effort to address the impact of climate change through the development of emissions trading schemes. However, at the international level, China has not reached agreement with the USA nor the EU on its contribution to the framework of international negotiations. Nevertheless, all parties agree that long-term emissions reduction strategies need to be found by 2015. For full Executive Summary of the panel with Mr. Stian Reklev (Moderator – Thomson Reuters), Mr. Zhang Xiaohua (National Centre for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation), Mr. Jacob Werksman (European Commission), Mr. Deng Liangchun (WWF), Ass. Pr. Craig Hart (Renmin University), download PDF: Learning from Warsaw COP19

Carsharing: A Solution to Traffic Bottlenecks in China’s Megacities?

Carsharing aims to complement the existing public transport system by providing on demand and short-term access to public automobiles. Carsharing separates car use from vehicle ownership. It intends to reduce the car population in a city to prevent traffic congestion and reduce pollution. Carsharing solutions have spread in western countries where local governments see them as convenient ways to reduce parking needs in the city centers and improve overall transportation efficiency. However, the concept is still very new in China.

In 2009, China became the world’s biggest auto market. By 2012, 14.7 million new cars were hitting China’s roads. This has led to a dramatic increase in the congestion and pollution problems in major cities. Municipalities, including Beijing, have adopted specific policies that limit the annual growth of private vehicle ownership and control when they can be used. There is therefore an opportunity for Chinese policy makers and researchers to further explore the potential of carsharing systems as part of the traffic congestion and pollution solution in each of China’s cities. For full Executive Summary, download PDF: Car sharing – A Solution to Traffic Bottlenecks in China

A National Energy Transition: Germany’s ‘Energiewende’ and China’s opportunities

The Panel - From Left: Dr. Sven-Uwe Müller (Moderator - GIZ), Dr. Hans-Joachim Ziesing (Expert Commission to monitor Germany’s ‘Energiewende’), Mr. Wang Zhongying (Energy Research Institute), Dr. Hu Zhaoguang (State Grid Energy Research Institute)

The Panel – From Left: Dr. Sven-Uwe Müller (Moderator – GIZ), Dr. Hans-Joachim Ziesing (Expert Commission to monitor Germany’s ‘Energiewende’), Mr. Wang Zhongying (Energy Research Institute), Dr. Hu Zhaoguang (State Grid Energy Research Institute)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Germany is well placed to achieve the ambitious goals of its National Energy Transition (Energiewende in German), yet a number of implementation challenges must be overcome, including – energy security (reducing energy imports); diversifying energy supply while phasing out nuclear power; gaining collective agreement on how to achieve the established targets, policies and measures; and, communicating the economic advantages to the broader community.

China’s environmental targets and low carbon pilot regions are two major efforts to restructure towards green economy, creating many opportunities for bilateral cooperation on energy planning and energy technologies. The lessons learned through ‘Energiewende’, over time, can help make China’s eventual energy transition an easier one. For the recored of discussion and an executive summary CCF’s panel with Dr. Sven-Uwe Müller (Moderator – GIZ), Dr. Hans-Joachim Ziesing (Expert Commission to monitor Germany’s ‘Energiewende’), Mr. Wang Zhongying (Energy Research Institute), and Dr. Hu Zhaoguang (State Grid Energy Research Institute), download PDF: A National Energy Transition 

ANU & CCF China Carbon Pricing Survey 2013 – Report briefing and launch

On 10th October, 2013 China Carbon Forum together with the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at the Australian National University’s Crawford School of Public Policy (ANU) held a report briefing on the China Carbon Pricing Survey 2013 at the UNDP compound, Beijing.

The survey for the first time provides a quantified analysis of the expectations that China-based experts hold about carbon pricing in China. The survey provides information about expected price levels, and the expected start dates of pilot schemes and a possible national carbon pricing scheme. This information is of key importance for investors in carbon-intensive sectors, the financial sector, and policymakers to better anticipate the future cost of carbon emissions.

Carbon market developments in China are of interest around the globe, and this survey sets out the possibilities as perceived by a large number of local experts. The survey is a joint initiative of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at the Australian National University’s Crawford School of Public Policy and China Carbon Forum. It is part of a new cooperative research program between China and Australia on market instruments for climate change action in China.

To access a full copy of the survey report in English and Chinese click here:

To access a copy of the executive summary in English and Chinese click here: